Free SLP
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.23.53 PM

Space Verb Adventure Virtual Board Game

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.24.01 PM

Swamp Verb Adventure Virtual Board Game

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.24.09 PM

Underwater Verb Adventure Virtual Board Game

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.26.13 PM

Fishy's Flight to Freedom Was / Were

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.26.43 PM

Verb Tense Drag and Drop | Irregular and Regular

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.27.14 PM

Verb Tense Slider | Irregular and Regular

Play Now
Screenshot 2024-03-08 at 2.27.20 PM

Flipcard Expanding MLU and Verb Tense

Play Now

Verb conjugations is when we are changing the form of the verb to match the subject of the sentence.

This means that the verb changes depending on who is doing the action and when it’s happening.

  • Let’s take the verb ‘to play.’ If I say, ‘I play soccer,’ the verb ‘play’ stays the same because I’m talking about myself, and I’m doing the action.

  • But if we change the subject to ‘she,’ it becomes ‘She plays soccer.’ We add an ‘s’ to the verb ‘play’ because it matches with ‘she.’

  • And if we’re talking about something that happened in the past, we use a different form of the verb. For example, ‘Yesterday, I played soccer.’

As parents, you can help your child with verb conjugations by practicing together. You can make it fun by playing games or using everyday activities to talk about different actions and who is doing them. The more they practice, the better they’ll get at using verbs correctly in their sentences!

 

Regular Verbs: Regular verbs follow a predictable pattern when changing tenses. For instance, ‘walk’ becomes ‘walked’ in the past tense. It’s like adding ‘ed’ to the end of the base verb. Examples include ‘play’ becoming ‘played’ or ‘jump’ becoming ‘jumped’.

Irregular Verbs: Irregular verbs don’t follow the usual pattern when changing tenses. Their past tense forms are unique and need to be learned individually. For instance, ‘go’ becomes ‘went’ and ‘eat’ becomes ‘ate’ in the past tense. They don’t add ‘ed’ like regular verbs.